What to Do When the Book You're Writing Throws You a Curve

The drafting of my memoir began in earnest sometime the late spring of 2012. I had jotted down notes and memories plus digging through boxes of my mother's personal papers for years. Folders filled with potential material for a book cover a work table.

Now, here we are approaching late spring of 2014, two years later. A few weeks ago as I was considering my progress and listening to my husband's take on what I had written for one particular chapter, I felt like I had been hit by a tidal wave of emotion.

It was as if a tsunami had taken over the life of my memoir, and what came next threw me for a curve.

An epiphany in the form of a major change in direction left me wonder struck. Not so much because it was such a stunning transformation, but because it had stared me in the eye since the year 2000, when the seed germinated into thoughts of a memoir after moving my mother to Oregon from Tennessee.

Now, what am I going to do was the next thought passing not so silently through my mind. It was simple: Regroup, rethink, rewrite--the writer's three R's.

Regroup: When I began writing my story of life with Mama, I sat down and started pounding out words on the computer screen without any thought for an outline or a plan. I knew the story I was writing and thought I needed no organizational scheme to get it done. So far, I believe I have a pretty good draft on that first turn. But this curve ball I've been thrown made me stop and take stock of the time I would have saved if I had gotten my writing act together first.

  • The first thing I decided I needed to do was spell out what I wanted to tell my readers and why. And I did.
  • I then moved on to think about outlining or story boarding. I vaguely remembered a post of Kathy Pooler's on Memoir Writer's Journey where Kathy talked about story boarding. Unable to find it, I emailed Kathy and she sent me the link, which is here.
Kathy Pooler's Storyboard
Kathy Pooler's Storyboard
  • As I sat and studied Kathy's storyboard, it occurred to me that my favorite writing software, Scrivener, uses a bulletin board with index cards to act as an option to an outline. I rarely use it, but checked it out and below is an image of my current storyboard or imaged outline in Scrivener:
Scrivener Corkboard
Scrivener Corkboard
  • I think it's going to work perfectly, and I've set about rewriting my first draft.

Rethink: A good deal of rethinking went into picking up the draft and rewriting it. Was this worth making the book into a better story to share with readers? Would the rewrite get my point across any better? After all, I'd spent a goodly number of hours not only in writing but researching, retrieving and reading.

  • I decided the answer was a yes. I want to publish not just a good book, but a book people will refer to as a "really good book," perhaps a "must read," maybe even a "bestseller." No matter the nomenclature used to describe it, I want it to be my best work product. So, yes, the extra time is worth the effort.
  • As I rethought the outline I'd come up with it, I could actually see the story unfolding in a much more cohesive fashion and with greater ease.
  • Rethinking taught me a great lesson: Rushing in headlong isn't always the best route to take.

Rewrite: I am actually enjoying this "R" of the three "R's" because I am sensing a better writing style, a tighter style. I feel the story coming together with less negativity about my mother, seasoned with a dash of her goodness here and there, because there was goodness in her. And at the end of her story and mine, I learn there was good reason for her parenting skills, or lack thereof. I think in the rewrite this will be more easily finessed.

Like schoolchildren sent off to learn their three "R's"--reading, writing and 'rithmetic, we writers can also learn from a different set of three "R's"--regroup, rethink and rewrite.

We're never too young or too far along in our writing to learn a little something or make a change in the direction we're headed.

Happy writing!